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JNHR, Volume 4, 2018

 

THE CAPACITY OF FOOD SERVICE PROVIDERS AS NUTRITION CHANGE AGENTS IN NURSING HOMES

L. Matwiejczyk, O. Farrer, J. Hamilton, M. Miller

Jour Nursing Home Res 2018;4:20-26

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Background: Despite the correlation between the food provided and nursing home residents’ food satisfaction, Quality of Life and health, the capacity of food service providers to enact positive nutrition-related changes is unknown. Objectives: Researchers explored (1) the experiences and perceptions of senior-level food service providers from nursing homes (NH) to elicit change prompted by participation in a national educational intervention (2) the barriers and enablers to eliciting change and (3) practice implications. Design: Using qualitative methodology, individual semi-structured interviews were conducted four months after the intervention and thematically analyzed. Participants: Participants were 23 senior-level food service providers from 21 NH in Victoria, Australia. Results: Participants started with the necessary confidence, knowledge and skills for food provision and three themes that best represent food service providers’ perceived capacity and experience to affect food service changes included: (1) participants’ motivations as change agents (2) empowerment facilitated by external factors (organizational, external and ongoing peer-support) and (3) constraints to enacting change (local and system-wide). Conclusion: Understanding the motivations and experiences of senior food service providers to enact change provides important information on the barriers and enablers which can be used to augment intervention planning and reduce the implementation gap between evidence-based recommendations and practice. A number of underlying mechanisms were identified and recommendations for system-wide changes made. Improvement in food and dining experiences may help to improve residents’ satisfaction with food which has been correlated with improved life satisfaction, health and well-being.

CITATION:
L. Matwiejczyk ; O. Farrer ; J. Hamilton ; M. Miller (2018): Intake rate survey and cooking methods of a novel texture-modified chicken designed for a soft diet. The Journal of Nursing Home Research Science (JNHRS). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jnhrs.2018.5

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TREATMENT OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION IN NURSING HOMES: A PLACE FOR DIRECT ACTING ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS?

M. Alcusky, K.L. Lapane

Jour Nursing Home Res 2018;4:15-19

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Atrial fibrillation affects ~1 in 6 long-term nursing home residents. After an ischemic stroke hospitalization, ~2/3 of nursing home residents receive skilled nursing care and functional independence continues to decline, a process often complicated by rehospitalization and stroke recurrence. Due to advanced age and multimorbidity, anticoagulation is indicated for essentially all nursing home residents with atrial fibrillation. Yet as the severity of cognitive and/or functional deficits increases, the net clinical benefit of anticoagulation becomes less certain. Therefore, nursing home residents are most likely to be in need of supportive clinical evidence regarding anticoagulation, but least likely to have risk/benefit information from trials. Approximately half of US nursing home residents with atrial fibrillation have been treated with warfarin historically. Trial evidence in ambulatory older adults supports a large relative risk reduction (~50%) for stroke with warfarin versus aspirin and generally comparable bleeding risk. However, nursing home residents have a complex confluence of multimorbidity and polypharmacy that distinguishes them from healthier, non-institutionalized trial populations. Exemplifying this distinction, maintaining nursing home residents treated with warfarin within the therapeutic range has been a challenge historically, increasing the risk of adverse events. The direct acting oral anticoagulants may be a preferred therapeutic option for an indeterminate fraction of nursing home residents with atrial fibrillation. A review of the literature on anticoagulant use in nursing homes underscores the need for evidence on the effectiveness and safety of the direct acting oral anticoagulants specific to clinically complex older adults.

CITATION:
M. Alcusky ; K.L. Lapane (2018): Treatment of atrial fibrillation in nursing homes: A place for direct acting oral anticoagulants?. The Journal of Nursing Home Research Science (JNHRS). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jnhrs.2018.4

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INTAKE RATE SURVEY AND COOKING METHODS OF A NOVEL TEXTURE-MODIFIED CHICKEN DESIGNED FOR A SOFT DIET

E. Watanabe, M. Maeno, M. Kamon, J. Kayashita, K. Miyamoto, M. Kogirima

Jour Nursing Home Res 2018;4:10-14

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Objectives: The elderly generally experience low occlusal force, which leads to decreased food intake. In this population, a soft diet with high protein content is necessary to avoid undernutrition. Here, we developed a novel texture-modified chicken using yogurt, with a hardness lower than 40,000 N/m2. Design: We applied a crossover design. Setting: Nursing home (long-term care health facility) in Kyoto, Japan from 12 to 24 June 2016. Participants: A total of 34 participants (mean age 89.7 years old, 82% female). Measurements: The proportions of minced chicken, yogurt, water, and potato starch in the texture-modified chicken were measured. The hardness and intake rate of teriyaki chicken using texture-modified chicken and conventional chicken thighs were also measured. Results: The amount of minced chicken, yogurt, water, and potato starch in the texture-modified chicken provided in the nursing home was 49.0 g, 16.2 g, 2.4 g, 2.4 g, respectively. The hardness was approximately 30,000 N/m2, which was lower than that of teriyaki chicken using conventional chicken thigh (> 63,000 N/m2). The intake rates of teriyaki chicken using texture-modified chicken and conventional chicken thigh were 75.3% and 60.0%, respectively. Conclusions: We developed a novel texture-modified chicken for a soft diet using yogurt. The texture-modified chicken had both softness and high nutrient content. Continuance of efforts such as that described in this study will lead to the prevention of undernutrition in the elderly.

CITATION:
E. Watanabe ; M. Maeno ; M. Kamon ; J. Kayashita ; K. Miyamoto ; M. Kogirima (2018): Intake rate survey and cooking methods of a novel texture-modified chicken designed for a soft diet. The Journal of Nursing Home Research Science (JNHRS). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jnhrs.2018.3

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NURSING HOMES CHARACTERISTICS ACCORDING TO THE RATE OF EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT TRANSFER: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

K. El Haddad , X. Dubusc, C. Cool, F. Nourhashémi, P. De Souto Barreto, Y. Rolland

Jour Nursing Home Res 2018;4:5-9

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Background: Despite comparable clinical characteristics of nursing home residents, the rate of emergency department transfer is highly variable from one nursing home to another, suggesting that structural characteristic and organizational factors may influence the rate of nursing home resident’s transfer to the emergency department. Objectives: To identify structural characteristics and medical care organization of nursing homes according to the rate of emergency department transfers of nursing home residents. Design: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis using the baseline data of the IQUARE study (Impact of a QUAlity improvement initiative on nursing practices and functional decline in NH REsidents), a non-randomized controlled multicenter trial with 175 nursing homes in south-western, France. Participants: 5926 nursing home residents. Measurement: Data on nursing home structural characteristics and medical care organization were collected by questionnaires between May and July 2011. Data concerning hospital admissions and emergency department transfers during the past year were retrieved from the residents’ medical files. Results: The rate of emergency department transfer in the last 12 months was 18.9% (±11.5): 7.4%, 18.4% and 31.4% for the low, medium and high tertile groups, respectively. Compared to the low transfer group, the high transfer group had less special care unit (RRR: 0.31, 95%CI 0.19-0.83, P: 0.018). The location of the high transfer group tends to be more urban than rural when compared to the low transfer group (RRR: 0.37, 95%CI 0.14-0.99, P: 0.047). Compared to the low transfer group, the high transfer group has less pharmacy for internal use (RRR: 0.10, 95%CI 0.03-0.38, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Our results suggest that implementing special care unit and pharmacy for internal use in nursing homes may reduce the rate of nursing home residents’ transfer to the emergency department. Geographic location seems to dissuade or encourage nursing home to transfer residents to the emergency department. Long-term interventions are needed to reduce the risk of inappropriate emergency department transfers, thus the risk and cost associated with hospitalization.

CITATION:
K. El Haddad ; X. Dubusc ; C. Cool ; F. Nourhashémi ; P. De Souto Barreto ; Y. Rolland (2018): Nursing homes characteristics according to the rate of emergency department transfer: a retrospective study. The Journal of Nursing Home Research Science (JNHRS). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jnhrs.2018.2

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USING ENVIRONMENTAL LIGHT THERAPY TO IMPROVE SLEEP AND NEUROPSYCHIATRIC SYMPTOMS IN ALZHEIMER SPECIAL CARE UNIT

S. Gonfrier, S. Al Rifai, L. Benattar, S. Bernabé, O. Guérin

Jour Nursing Home Res 2018;4:1-4

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No study has been able to definitively demonstrate that it is effective at improving the behavior of patients with ADRS. The main objective of our study was to assess the influence of environmental light therapy (from 5 am to 10 pm) on nocturnal sleep patterns of individuals with ADRS. Secondary objectives were to study the time spent sleeping during the day, the level of anxiety based on the COVI scale, and the extent of behavioral disorders based on the NPI scale.Twelve nursing home residents were studied who were exposed to integrated light therapy in common areas. The residents were equipped with a wrist or ankle actimeter for 42 days. This time period was divided into three periods of 14 days, with standard lighting in period 1 and 3, and light therapy during period 2. Their sleep time was determined using Cole-Kripke algorithms. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were assessed based on the COVI scale for anxiety and the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI).Duration of nocturnal sleep was significantly higher with light therapy by 15.8 minutes on average, the total sleep time during period 2 was significantly increased by 55.1 minutes compared to period 1. The COVI scale measurements indicated that there was a significant decrease of 0.7 points and the NPI scale decreased significantly by 4.9 points between periods 1 and 2. The use of environmental light therapy resulted in a significant increase in the nocturnal sleep and total sleep times, as well as improvement of the level of anxiety and in terms of behavior.

CITATION:
S. Gonfrier ; S. Al Rifai ; L. Benattar ; S. Bernabé ; O. Guérin (2018): Using environmental light therapy to improve sleep and neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer special care unit. The Journal of Nursing Home Research Science (JNHRS). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jnhrs.2018.1

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