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WHAT IS THE “RIGHT” NUMBER OF NURSING HOME BEDS FOR POPULATION NEEDS? AN INDICATOR DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

D.M. Wilson, R.R. Brow, R. Playfair

Jour Nursing Home Res 2017;3:16-21

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The need for nursing homes is increasing rapidly now with accelerating population aging and other socio-demographic developments. No indicators currently exist to specify the number of nursing home beds that should be available to meet population requirements. To meet this gap, descriptive-comparative information was gathered on the number of nursing home beds that exist in 10 Canadian provinces and 15 high-income countries and other relevant information. Major differences were found in bed numbers relative to population age structures, with a set of three median indicators (109.4, 17.5, and 4.5) developed to identify the mid-range number of citizens of all ages per nursing home bed, citizens aged 65+ per nursing home bed, and citizens aged 80+ per nursing home bed. Indicators such as these enable comparisons of actual to optimal. The devised set of three indicators should raise nursing attention to nursing home bed accessibility, and further policy and planning for the nursing home expansion required with population aging.

CITATION:
D.M. Wilson ; R.R. Brow ; R. Playfair ; (2017): What is the “Right” Number of Nursing Home Beds for Population Needs? An Indicator Development Project. The Journal of Nursing Home Research Science (JNHRS). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jnhrs.2017.3

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WORKER INJURIES IN NURSING HOMES: IS SAFE PATIENT HANDLING LEGISLATION THE SOLUTION?

K.L. Lapane, C.E. Dubé, B.M. Jesdale

Jour Nursing Home Res 2016;2:110-117

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In 2012, nursing homes were considered the most dangerous workplaces in the United States. While other industries have guidelines that limit manual lifting of stable objects to ≤50 pounds, the same is not so in the nursing home industry where residents requiring physical assistance may weigh over 250 pounds and where the prevalence of obesity among residents is increasing. Safe patient handling legislation in nursing homes has been enacted in nine of the United States since 2005 (Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Texas). This paper reviews the problem of worker injuries in nursing homes, describes the legislation passed to address the problem, and reviews the data available on the effectiveness of the legislation. No national studies evaluating the effectiveness of safe patient handling state policies on nursing home injuries exists, although the National Institute on Occupational Safety and Health has recently funded a national evaluation.

CITATION:
K.L. Lapane ; C.E. Dubé ; B.M. Jesdale (2016): WORKER INJURIES IN NURSING HOMES: IS SAFE PATIENT HANDLING LEGISLATION THE SOLUTION?. The Journal of Nursing Home Research Science (JNHRS). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jnhrs.2016.17

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TASTE OF TEN DRUGS FREQUENTLY PRESCRIBED IN NURSING HOMES CRUSHED AND MIXED IN FOOD: OBSERVATIONAL STUDY IN 16 HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS

J. Lamure, P. Brocker, S.M. Schneider, R. Collomp, F. Bertin-Hugault, P. Denormandie, I. Prêcheur

Jour Nursing Home Res 2015;1:55-61

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Background & Aims: Many frail elderly patients are polymedicated. Whether they suffer from dysphagia (due to stroke, Parkinson’s disease, etc.) or cognitive troubles (due to Alzheimer’s disease, etc.), they are often given blended food, with drugs crushed and mixed into the food. Health Authorities recommend to crush and to administrate crushed drugs separately, for pharmacologic reasons, but the drugs are usually mixed together to facilitate ease of case by nursing staff. Crushed drugs can have a bad taste, leading to drug / food refusal, worsening malnutrition, but this qualitative aspect has been scarcely studied in geriatric populations. The present study aimed to evaluate the taste of the ten drugs most frequently prescribed in nursing homes, in order to determine which drugs are acceptable or not when crushed and mixed into food. Methods: This one-step observational study was designed like a food or wine tasting. A jury of healthy volunteers was recruited among medical staff (8 volunteers) and other people involved in food and gastronomy (8 volunteers, including a starred Chef). Every tablet or capsule was mixed into 100 mL of berry-flavored jelly or apple sauce. It was a blind tasting of 24 verrines, containing the ten drugs randomly distributed, a control without drug and a combination of the 6 top-list drugs. Twelve jelly verrines were followed by 12 apple sauce verrines. Tasters spat the spoonful content out after they had assessed its taste. Each verrine was scored from 0 (bad taste) to 10 (good). Qualitative and free comments were also recorded. Results: The lowest scores were attributed to the combination of paracetamol, alprazolam, furosemide, levothyroxine sodium, memantine and zopiclone (1.5 + 1.6; 0 to 5), followed by zopiclone (1.9 + 2.3; 0 to 8), clopidogrel (4.3 + 2.1; 1 to 7) and paracetamol (4.6 + 1.8; 1 to 8). All these drugs had a long-lasting bitterness. Zopiclone mixed and alone was qualified as unbearable and one participant exhibited nausea by taking it. Five participants did not take lunch after the study for lack of hunger (5/16: 31.3 %). Drug-free jelly and apple sauce were scored 6.7 + 1.4 (4 to 9) and 7.1 + 1.1 (5-9.5), respectively. Other scores ranged from 6.1 to 7.9, for alprazolam, ramipril, oxazepam, levothyroxine sodium, donezepil and furosemide. Conclusions: The taste of some drugs may be unbearable when they are crushed and mixed into food, and caregivers should avoid mixing a bad-tasting drug with the other drugs. There are wide differences of taste acceptability from one person to another. Thus, during workshops, every patient could taste once separately any single drug in his prescription list. If a bad taste leads to drug refusal, caregivers should inform physicians and pharmacists, who in turn should seek alternative medical solutions (drug discontinuation or substitution). Caregivers could also seek alternative food or administration conditions. On a mid-term basis, pharmaceutical companies should also develop specific pharmaceutical forms, as they do for children.

CITATION:
J. Lamure ; P. Brocker ; S.M. Schneider ; R. Collomp ; F. Bertin-Hugault ; P. Denormandie ; I. Prêcheur (2015): TASTE OF TEN DRUGS FREQUENTLY PRESCRIBED IN NURSING HOMES CRUSHED AND MIXED IN FOOD: OBSERVATIONAL STUDY IN 16 HEALTHY VOLUNTEERS. The Journal of Nursing Home Research Science (JNHRS). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jnhrs.2015.12

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RECOMMENDATIONS ON PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND EXERCISE FOR OLDER ADULTS LIVING IN LONG-TERM CARE FACILITIES: A TASKFORCE REPORT

P. de Souto Barreto, J.E. Morley, W. Chodzko-Zajko, K.H. Pitkala, E. Weening-Djiksterhuis, L. Rodriguez-Mañas, M. Barbagallo, E. Rosendahl, A. Sinclair, F. Landi, M. Izquierdo, B. Vellas, Y. Rolland, under the auspices of The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics – Global Aging Re

Jour Nursing Home Res 2016;2:7-20

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A taskforce, under the auspices of The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics – Global Aging Research Network (IAGG-GARN) and the IAGG European Region Clinical Section, composed of experts from the fields of exercise science and geriatrics met in Toulouse, in December 2015, with the aim of establishing recommendations of physical activity and exercise for older adults living in long-term care facilities (LTCF). Due to the high heterogeneity in terms of functional ability and cognitive function that characterizes older adults living in LTCFs, taskforce members established two sets of recommendations: recommendations for reducing sedentary behaviors for all LTCF residents and recommendations for defining specific, evidence-based guidelines for exercise training for subgroups of LTCF residents. In order to promote a successful implementation of recommendations, taskforce experts highlighted the importance of promoting residents’ motivation and pleasure, the key factors that can be increased when taking into account residents’ desires, preferences, beliefs and attitudes toward physical activity and exercise. The importance of organizational factors related to LTCFs and healthcare systems were recognized by the experts. In conclusion, this taskforce report proposes standards for the elaboration of strategies to increase physical activity as well as to prescribe exercise programs for older adults living in LTCFs. This report should be used as a guide for professionals working in LTCFs settings.

CITATION:
P. de Souto Barreto ; J.E. Morley ; W. Chodzko-Zajko ; K.H. Pitkala ; E. Weening-Djiksterhuis ; L. Rodriguez-Mañas ; M. Barbagallo ; E. Rosendahl ; A. Sinclair ; F. Landi ; M. Izquierdo ; B. Vellas ; Y. Rolland ; under the auspices of The International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics – Global Aging Research Network (IAGG-GARN) and the IAGG European Region Clinical Section (2016): Recommendations on physical activity and exercise for older adults living in long-term care facilities: a taskforce report. The Journal of Nursing Home Research Science (JNHRS). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jnhrs.2016.2

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NOTHING VENTURED, NOTHING GAINED: ACCEPTABILITY TESTING OF MICRONUTRIENT FORTIFICATION IN LONG-TERM CARE

I.T.Y. Lam, H.H. Keller, L.M. Duizer, K.D. Stark, A.M. Duncan

Jour Nursing Home Res 2015;1:18-27

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Background: Purpose: Malnutrition is common in long-term care (LTC) residents, yet limited research exists on micronutrient deficiencies. Objective: This study used qualitative methods to explore the acceptability of a food-first micronutrient fortification strategy for LTC and further develop this strategy. Design & participants: Qualitative cross-sectional data collection based on eleven staff focus groups (n=45), ten expert key informant interviews, and five family/resident focus groups (n=71) were conducted. Data were triangulated during content analysis, completed by two coders. Results: Stakeholders provided insight into benefits, concerns and potential solutions to minimize barriers and promote adherence to the strategy. Suggested solutions included development of outsourced/pre-made fortified products, mandatory training and clear protocols. Stakeholders can envision food fortification as a strategy to improve micronutrient status if products are easy to access and incorporate into current production systems. Yet, residents and families wish to be informed and have the potential to ‘opt out’. Safety and efficacy also needs to be demonstrated before it is incorporated into standard practice. Conclusion: This work provides a strong foundation for developing a proof-of-concept micronutrient food fortification study for the prevention of deficiencies in LTC.

CITATION:
I.T.Y. Lam ; H.H. Keller ; L.M. Duizer ; K.D. Stark ; A.M. Duncan ; (2015): NOTHING VENTURED, NOTHING GAINED: ACCEPTABILITY TESTING OF MICRONUTRIENT FORTIFICATION IN LONG-TERM CARE. The Journal of Nursing Home Research Science (JNHRS). http://dx.doi.org/10.14283/jnhrs.2015.5

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2020

JNHR N°6 - 2020 - See articles

 

2019

JNHR N°5 - 2019 - See articles

 

2018

JNHR N°4 - 2018 - See articles

 

2017

JNHR N°3 - 2017 - See articles

 

2016

JNHR N°2 - 2016 - See articles

 

2015

JNHR N°1 - 2015 - See articles